SMFA Classes

Ceramics

Ceramics I: Wheel Throwing

This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of ceramics process through the method of using the potters wheel. Students will learn the fundamentals of throwing all basic elemental pottery forms, cylinders, bowls, plates and enclosed forms. In addition to forming we will use various firing and glazing methods that include, low-fire, pit-fire, raku and stoneware.

Section 1
Faculty: Michael Barsanti
Class No.: 22694
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Thurs. 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Ceramics Sculpture

This course deals with sculptural issues and techniques in ceramics and is open to anyone who is using clay as a component of their artistic process. Projects are open-ended and can include mixed-media sculptural work, installation, performance or related media. Previous experience in ceramics is encouraged but not required.

Section 1
Faculty: Michael Barsanti
Class No.: 22692
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Weds. 9AM - 12 PM, 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Directed Study

This is an intermediate/advanced course that is self-designed and non-media specific. Although my specialty is ceramics this course makes use of my skill sets that include sculptural materials including metal, wood, glass and clay with an emphasis on combining materials. I am also comfortable with time based, digital and performance arts including photo, video, and sound. All student projects will require individual goal outlines, research and individual crits. There will be opportunities for group crits with other class members of this course on a sign up basis.

Section 1
Faculty: Michael Barsanti
Class No.: 22693
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Weds. 6PM - 9PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 0.5

Digital Media

Introduction to Digital Media

Focused on the concepts and practical techniques used in producing artwork in the digital domain. Problems that often arise in creating video, audio, and Internet work can be avoided by developing a deeper understanding of the under-the-hood workings of hardware and software. Students are provided with a skill set that is flexible, adaptable, and generalized: not just a mastery of the specific tools we have today, but an ability to translate their skills to the software and hardware that will exist in the future. Technical material covered will include file formats, binary representations, digital color, compositing modes, alpha channels, video compression, data rate, practical audio recording techniques, datamoshing, header munging, and principles of creative coding. We will also consider the larger critical concepts of encoded representations, sequential vs. random access, the increasing importance of quantification and intelligent algorithms, and the inherent strengths and weaknesses of analog vs. digital forms. The course does not require any prior experience with digital audio or video.

Section 1
Faculty: Kurt Ralske
Class No.: 22895
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Mon. 2PM - 5PM, 6PM - 9PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Virtual Reality

This hybrid studio/seminar class focuses on the practice and theory of creating Virtual Reality environments in fine art, design, and commercial contexts. Using software for real-time rendering (Unity3D) and software for modeling (SketchUp, Cinema4D), students construct immersive interactive audio-visual environments to be viewed with VR hardware (Google Cardboard, HTC Vive, Oculus RiU). Alongside the creative work of building their own custom VR projects, the will class will discuss the history of the philosophical, aesthetic, and political dimensions of mimeNc representation (the building of image-worlds), as theorized by Plato, Samuel Coleridge, Friedrich Nietzsche, Siegfried Kracauer, Walter Benjamin, Eric Auerbach, Theodor Adorno, Guy Debord, Jonathan Crary, Michael Taussig, and Homi Bhabha. This course is appropriate for students who have some experience with video, and who are comfortable engaging with critical concepts. If any questions, please contact the instructor.

Section 1
Faculty: Kurt Ralske
Class No.: 22896
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Tues. 9AM - 12 PM, 2 PM - 5 PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Diploma

Diploma Seminar

The Diploma Seminar acts as the central core of the Diploma Program, where students become an integrated group working together toward their individual goals. The Seminar emphasizes individual growth and support as you progress through the Program through regular critiques, discussions, self-assessment, long-range inquiry and planning. Students will work with peers in the program and receive guidance from advisors, mentors, and the Faculty Program Director. Instruction will be provided in specific areas pertaining to professional art practice not covered by general curriculum courses to include projects, study material, and discussion on aspects of current practice, recent trends in visual art, the role of visual arts in contemporary culture, support and resources for artists, the art audience, and business aspects of art production (such as presentation, sales, and grant support). *Seminar is required of all Diploma Program students for four-semesters.

Section 1
Faculty: Nan Freeman
Class No.: 22687
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Tues. 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 0.5

Section 2
Faculty: Michelle Samour
Class No.: 22688
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Fri. 9AM - 12 PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 0.5

Diploma Independent Project

A special Independent Project will be planned and carried out by each student during one semester of the Diploma Program. The project is conceived, planned, and arranged individually in consultation with faculty and may be carried out locally, nationally, or internationally.

Section 1
Faculty: Michelle Samour
Class No.: 22690
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Tues. 9AM - 12 PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Section 2
Faculty: Nan Freeman
Class No.: 22691 
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location:Tues. 9AM - 12 PM 
Credit: 1

Drawing

Introduction to Drawing Studio

Drawing Studio is an introductory drawing course focusing on the development of skills and techniques. Fundamental approaches to observational drawing will be presented as students explore what it means to draw; these techniques include line, mark making, perspective, tonal value, composition, point of view, proportion, and measurement. Strong composition, clear communication and exciting design will be emphasized through a combination of focused exercises, projects, demonstrations, critiques, and individual instruction. This course teaches its students the fundamentals of drawing allowing students to create connections across the curriculum. Drawing Studio is ideal for students new to drawing and for those interested in improving their artistic practice. Students will be required to purchase materials.

Section 1
Faculty: Mara Metcalf
Class No.: 23446
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Mon. 9AM - 12PM
Credit: 0.5

Intro to Drawing: Intensive

This course is a comprehensive introduction to drawing techniques and materials for for first year students or students new to college-level art making who are specifically interested in drawing, painting, and print media. Strong technical drawing skills as well as personal development of expression will be covered. Coursework will include in-class demonstrations, presentations, exercises and assignments. Homework will be assigned. Students will be required to purchase materials.

Section 1
Faculty: Karmimadeebora McMillan
Class No.: 23447
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Tues. 9AM - 12PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Intro to Interdisciplinary Drawing

This entry level course is good preparation for students interested in pursuing interdisciplinary practice and is designed to focus on the use of drawing as a bridge to other media such as sculpture, video, performance, and research. While remaining based in essential drawing tools, this course explores experimental processes and includes the use of digital technology in planning and concept development as well as the ability to address the multi-area development of laser and 3-D printers. Coursework will include in-class demonstrations, presentations, exercises and assignments. Homework will be assigned. Students will be required to purchase materials.

Section 1
Faculty: Santiago Cucullu
Class No.: 23448
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Thurs. 9AM - 12PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 0.5

Bumps on the Wall

For thousands of years humanity has used the wall for visual expression and presentation. It has been a pivotal place/space for countless artists to work to, for and against. From the ancient cave paintings of Altimira to Ghiberti and Brunelleschi to Schwitters, Arp, Duchamp and Dine and Rauschenberg to Boltanski, Kieffer, Gober and Sara Sze, we are still finding the wall a place of necessity and interest. This class is for students working in any media who are curious about merging their various approaches into one creative experience and incorporating the wall as an integral part of their art practice…not just a place to install and view the work. With fabrication and mixing media along with the use of found and formed materials, we will investigate and integrate new ways of moving from 2-D to 3-D and even 4-D. We will build from old work and existing imagery to create new possibilities. The class has weekly assignments as well as homework and an all-term project. Practical demonstrations on assemblage, attachments, installation, adhesives, and fasteners will be conducted. Many construction materials will be provided.

Section 1
Faculty: Charles Goss
Class No.: 23462
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Thurs. 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Intro to Figure Drawing

Observational Figure Drawing provides students an introduction to the essentials of life-drawing. Proportion, scale, shading, composition, and mark making will be covered, as well as historical and contemporary approaches to realizing the figure. Coursework will include in-class demonstrations, presentations, exercises and assignments. This course is recommended for students new to drawing and for those interested in improving their life-drawing skills. Students will be required to purchase materials.

Section 1
Faculty: Mara Metcalf
Class No.: 23449
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Weds. 9AM - 12PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 0.5

Intermediate Expressive Figure: Figuremania

Whether you draw to generate ideas or have already realized a complete vision, this course will expose students to concepts and strategies prevalent in figure drawing today. Drawing a figure involves all of the senses in addition to encouraging students to observe, analyze, compare, select, and give voice to their imaginings. Intermediate students will engage in a deep examination of what it means to consider the body while developing their observational techniques. Students will examine multiple strategies for representing the body. Surface anatomy will be addressed as a way to build a deeper understanding of the mechanics beneath the skin. The use of sighting and tonal rendering, proportion, weight, mass, light, and movement will be explored. Longer poses will provide students the opportunity to develop drawings at various stages to concentrate on content and form. Students will be encouraged to combine visual accuracy and conceptual expression. This course will include regular critiques, drawing assignments, and readings on relevant figurative artists.

Section 1
Faculty: Mara Metcalf
Class No.: 23467 
Session: Regular
Date, Time, Location: Weds. 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 0.5

Advanced Drawing

This is a class for students with a background in drawing, painting, print and installation based practices. It will offer opportunities for students to expand and consider the physical range of their drawings in relationship to place, space and viewers. We will explore techniques and strategies for working at large scale, whether in traditional media or in more temporal installation based approaches. The class will be organized around three core projects. The first will examine the viewpoint of the audience in relationship to the conception and depiction of the figure within a large format drawing piece. The second will look into the ways we can use non-traditional media such as projections, found objects, mist, dirt or sound to deal with the constraints of light, space and architecture. The third will examine methods of working with drawing in public, whether that be collaborative or intervention based situations. For example students might propose and make wall drawings, murals, drawing machines, activism related works, pranks, environmental or site based alterations, performances and so on. This class will require students to consider a broad range of material, technical and conceptual options within their work with the goal of broadening an understanding of what drawing is and can be. It will also offer opportunities for students to build their professional skills as we focus on the language, text and discussion surrounding the proposal, presentation and documentation of projects, no matter the setting.

Section 1
Faculty: Ethan Murrow
Class No.: 23545
Session: Regular
Date, Time, Location: Wed 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Intermediate Drawing: Strat of Repre

This intermediate course is designed for students with some experience in life drawing or drawing from observation, who want to further develop their drawing skills. Through class presentations, exercises and assignments, readings, discussions, and critiques, students will gain a broad understanding of how to improve their representational drawing skills. In addition students will also understand how artists have used representational drawing to express their ideas. Students will be required to purchase materials.

Section 1
FacultyEthan Murrow
Class No.: 23464
Session: Regular
Date, Time, Location: Tues. 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Advanced Project: Drawing Dialogue

This course is for advanced students developing independent projects in drawing. The relation of content, strategies, and contexts will be explored, shared, and emphasized. Coursework will include in-class work on independent projects, group and individual critique and class discussions. Homework will be assigned.

Section 1
Faculty: Charles Goss
Class No.: 23470
Session: Regular
Date, Time, Location: Fri. 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Drawing Directed Study

This class consists of one on one meetings in which a student will meet individually with a faculty member several times over the course of the semester to critique work, assess progress, and develop mentorship between individual faculty and students. Individual critique sessions promote and foster abundant work and rapid progress by helping students deepen their understanding of their artwork, creative process, and work method through focused critical feedback at regular intervals. The student is asked to present a statement of intent, quantifying expected output, topics of interest or a statement of goals at the first meeting. At the end of the semester s/he will summarize the work; this could also be in the form of developing an artist’s statement. Faculty will meet each student four or more times a semester for a full hour. There may also be group meetings with peers to discuss work and progress among fellow students. Group meetings will assist students in developing invaluable skills for responding and giving feedback to one another regarding the work of fellow students. Students can only take the same Directed Study course twice. Directed Study is for upperclassmen and advanced students (MFA, Post-Baccalaureate, Diploma or Third and Fourth year BFA Students). Students are limited to a maximum of two Directed Studies in one semester which cannot be in the same area. Faculty permission required.

Section 1
Faculty: Charles Goss
Class No.: 23468
Session: Regular
Date, Time, Location: Weds. 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 0.5

Education

Art Education for Special Populations

Section 1
Faculty: Katherine Furst
Class No.: 21297
Session: Regular
Date, Time, Location: Mon. 5:30PM - 8:30PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Student Teach Art Prek-8

(Fall 2010 & Beyond). The course is designed to support student art teachers in their practicum full-time internship in a school art classroom for grades PK-8. Emphasis is placed on developing the artist/researcher/teacher identity with a critical view on the role of art education in visual culture and multicultural education. The role of teaching philosophy, social justice issues, student voice & activism, public school culture, and curriculum development are studied. Strategies and organization for meeting state requirements to achieve teacher licensure are offered through the standards presented in the state Dept of Education's Pre-service Performance Assessment. Professional practices and career launching strategies are explored. Lifelong learning as a community leader in art education is modeled through an exhibit and gallery talk at the culminating event, the Art Education Festival. Recommendations: MAT students only.

Section 1
Faculty: Susan Barahal
Class No.: 21293
Session: Regular
Date, Time, Location: Wed. 4PM - 7PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Semester Student Teaching 5-12

The course is designed to support student art teachers in their practicum full-time internship in a school art classroom for grades 5-12. Emphasis is placed on developing the artist/researcher/teacher identity with a critical view on the role of art education in visual culture and multicultural education. The role of teaching philosophy, social justice issues, student voice & activism, public school culture, and curriculum development are studied. Strategies and organization for meeting state requirements to achieve teacher licensure are offered through the standards presented in the state Dept of Education's Pre-service Performance Assessment. Professional practices and career launching strategies are explored. Lifelong learning as a community leader in art education is modeled through an exhibit and gallery talk at the culminating event, the Art Education Festival. Recommendations: MAT students only.

Section 1
Faculty: Katherine Furst
Class No.: 21294
Session: Regular
Date, Time, Location: Wed. 4PM - 7PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 2

Art Ed Curriculum Prek-8

(Fall 2010 & Beyond). This course focuses on curriculum development for elementary and middle school art programs. Emphasis is placed on lesson and unit plan writing, curriculum design, and critical study of existing art curricula. Discussion topics include: curriculum development for diverse student populations, integration of art with other subjects, the application of national and state standards to curriculum, evaluation criteria and procedures, and studies of contemporary art and visual culture in art curricula. Instructional methods, assessment strategies, art media, and technologies will be explored through student projects and presentations. Recommendations: MAT students only unless granted special permission.

Section 1
Faculty: Pamela Bower-Basso
Class No.: 21295
Session: Regular
Date, Time, Location: Thurs. 4PM - 7PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Art Education Curriculum 5-12

(Fall 2010 & Beyond). This course will guide students in formulating a standards-based curriculum for a yearlong high school or middle school course. Methods and examples will be reviewed, evaluated and discussed so students can compose their own goals, objectives, units and lessons that reflect the National Standards and the Massachusetts Frameworks. This course strives to help students understand the definition, purpose, and variety of different curricula and the role of curriculum in the art classroom. The course fosters the development of sequential units, guided by enduring understandings and essential questions. Lessons will reflect the knowledge and practice of differentiated instruction and reflect a strong academic tradition and sensitivity to the developmental growth and personal uniqueness of all learners. Multicultural education and postmodernism will be included in curriculum perspectives. Written reflections and presentations on curriculum ideas, and assessment revolving around the facets of understanding are important components of the course. Guest speakers will include former students who will share their teaching experiences as well as an evaluator for the Advanced Placement program who will discuss the requirements and assessment rubrics of the AP program. Recommendations: MAT students only unless granted special permission.

Section 1
Faculty: Pamela Bower-Basso
Class No.: 21296
Session: Regular
Date, Time, Location: Tues. 4PM - 7PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

English

English II: Differences

Like English 1, English 2 is a composition course designed to provide a foundation for writing in other courses. Unlike English 1, English 2 offers students the opportunity to choose among several seminar topics, all of which are approached in an interdisciplinary way. While drawing on various materials including fiction, essays, films and other visual and aural texts, English 2 puts the primary emphasis on students' own writing. English 2 is offered both semesters, with substantially fewer sections in the fall. English 1 (or 3) is a prerequisite for this course.

Section 1
Faculty: Adam Spellmire
Class No.: 23997
Session: Regular
Date, Time, Location: Mon., Weds., 6PM - 7:15PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

English II: Family Ties

Like English 1, English 2 is a composition course designed to provide a foundation for writing in other courses. Unlike English 1, English 2 offers students the opportunity to choose among several seminar topics, all of which are approached in an interdisciplinary way. While drawing on various materials including fiction, essays, films and other visual and aural texts, English 2 puts the primary emphasis on students' own writing. English 2 is offered both semesters, with substantially fewer sections in the fall. English 1 (or 3) is a prerequisite for this course.

Section 1
Faculty: Cheryl Alison
Class No.: 23998
Session: Regular
Date, Time, Location: Tues., Thurs., 6PM - 7:15PM
Credit: 1

English II: Conformity and Rebellion

Like English 1, English 2 is a composition course designed to provide a foundation for writing in other courses. Unlike English 1, English 2 offers students the opportunity to choose among several seminar topics, all of which are approached in an interdisciplinary way. While drawing on various materials including fiction, essays, films and other visual and aural texts, English 2 puts the primary emphasis on students' own writing. English 2 is offered both semesters, with substantially fewer sections in the fall. English 1 (or 3) is a prerequisite for this course.

Section 1
Faculty: Adam Spellmire
Class No.: 23999
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Mon., Weds., 7:30PM - 8:45PM, TBA, Fenway 
Credit: 1

Film and Animation

Sound and the Moving Image

When combined, sound and image influence each other in subtle and complex ways. This course provides students with the practical and conceptual skills to creatively use sound (voice, sound effects, sound design, music) with film and video. We will study examples of sound/image pairings taken from the canon of cinema, and analyze how they were constructed technically and how they function aesthetically. In addition to the conventional strategies used in narrative films of the past and present, special focus will be given to the radical experiments of Jean-Luc Godard, David Lynch, Orson Welles, Toru Takemitsu, Christian Marclay, Ryan Trecartin, Candice Breitz, and others. Practical audio techniques covered will include: digital audio recording devices, microphone selection and placement, audio editing software, dynamics control, equalization, noise reduction, workflow, mixing, and mastering. Small and large assignments will give students the opportunity to explore the strategies studied in the examples and to practice practical skills. The techniques and concepts covered in the class will be drawn from cinema, but are equally applicable to projects executed as video, installation, and image-for-sound. The goal of the course is for students to develop an expanded concept of the possibilities for sound and image, a more personal vision of how to utilize sound and image in their work, and the technical skills to achieve their vision.

Section 1
Faculty: Kurt Ralske
Class No.: 23437
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Tues., 6PM - 9PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 0.5

Animation Basics

Through in-class exercises, demos, screenings, and visiting artists, you will learn various techniques of animating, and how to record and mix a soundtrack for animation. The three techniques we cover are Drawn, Cut-Out, and Stop-Motion Animation. The bigger-picture scope of this course: How to make an animated short film, on your own, from concept to final edit. Animation Basics is the first of three courses (along with Animation 2 and Animation 3: The Animated Short) designed to train you to become not only a director/maker of animated films, but an artist who uses animation as a means of personal expression. Most assignments will be worked on in class using both analogue and digital techniques/equipment. Software covered: Dragonframe, Premiere, Photoshop, and Adobe Animate. No previous experience required, just an open mind.

Section 1
Faculty: Joel Frenzer
Class No.: 23475
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Tues., 2PM - 5PM, 6PM - 9PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Intro to Moving Image

This beginner level studio class will introduce students to the conceptual and practical aspects of the medium of moving image. We will explore the medium through screenings, readings, discussions, practice and critique of student’s works. The course will cover basic production skills such as camera operation and composition, editing in Adobe Premiere Pro and special effects (green screen, compositing etc.) in Adobe After Effects. Students will be assigned weekly projects in moving image and will have the opportunity to experiment and develop a body of work in this medium.

Section 1
Faculty: Irina Yakubov
Class No.: 23439
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Weds., 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Animation Integration

This course is designed for students who specialize in another area to reimagine/recontextualize their work frame-by-frame through animation. Students will be introduced to a wide variety of animation techniques with special attention given to their multimedia possibilities. Students working in film, sculpture, painting, photography, performance, video, ceramics, drawing etc. will consider the possibilities for animating their work and learn the techniques necessary for integrating animation into their art practice. The course is aimed to help students who don't see themselves becoming animators as such, but who have an interest in finding ways to expand their current practice through animation. Special consideration will be given to installation concerns and alternative methods of presentation. Class time will be split between screenings, demonstrations, work time and field trips to view animation in public and/or gallery settings when possible. Showcasing animation in the gallery is also a component: (ex. Julian Opie, Natalie Djurberg, Allison Shulnik, William Kentridge, Kara Walker, etc) The final projects have usually been installations.

Section 1
Faculty: Maya Erdelyi-Perez
Class No.: 23433
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Fri., 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM
Credit: 1

The Animated Short

This course is designed to utilize the personal voice, practice, and artistic strengths, gained from Animation 2, to complete an animated short film. Students will propose an idea for a semester long project, be responsible for creating and maintaining a production schedule, and submit their final animated short film, with sound, to the SMFA at Tufts Media Annual juried show (date TBA.) An emphasis on Aesthetics, Art Direction, and Theme will be incorporated into class discussions and individual meetings. This course will also cover: preparing a demo-reel for free-lance work, submitting an animated short film to festivals, and strategies on maintaining a creative life. A field trip to various Boston animation studios for internship possibilities will also be part of the syllabus.

Section 1
Faculty: Joel Frenzer
Class No.: 23476
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Weds. 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM
Credit: 1

Drawing for Animation

Drawing for Animation will build drawn animation skills through in-class exercises and related assignments. Students will animate all their work on paper using a variety of dry and wet media. They will gain knowledge of the physics of motion, squash and stretch, time-based blurring, perspective in motion, kinesthesia, and the use of light and shadow. Observational skills will be enhanced by using a live model, and by analyzing live-action footage and exemplary animation. GIFS, and methods of integrating illustration and digital drawing formats will also be included. A wide range of independent animated films are screened to demonstrate different techniques and approaches.

Section 1
Faculty: Maya Erdelyi-Perez
Class No.: 23434
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Thurs., 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM
Credit: 1

Graphic Arts

Cyanotype and the Contemporary

In this introductory class, we will build on the pioneering work of Anna Atkins (1799-1871), widely accepted as the first woman photographer. Atkins worked with cyanotype (“blue printing”), one of the first hand-applied photographic processes (invented in 1842 by astronomer Sir John Herschel). Using this cutting edge imaging technology of her day, Atkins produced the world’s first photographically illustrated book, Photographs of British Algae: Cyanotype Impressions (1843-54). As we investigate her works – both her scientific books and her personal albums – we will explore the conjunctions of art and science, text and image. We will also consider the idea of collections (personal/narrative as well as scientific), and will look at work by artists who explore collecting as an art-making strategy. Using a combination of handmade and digital imaging, students will build on Atkins’ trailblazing work to make artists’ books and book-inspired objects in a 21st century context. Techniques taught: cyanotype, cyanotype toning, paste paper (combined with cyan), photograms, cliché verre (19th c. and contemporary), “from-cell-phone-to-cyanotype,” basic bookbinding for artist books, and production of laser-printed transparencies. (No previous darkroom or book experience necessary.)

Section 1
Faculty: Jesseca Ferguson
Class No.: 23324
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Weds., 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM
Credit: 1

Book Arts: Chapter One

An introduction to the world of artists' books both one of a kind and multiples; this course is for artists of any discipline who want to explore the book format. The class is hands on and students will learn many book structures including pamphlets, concertinas, multisignature, wire hinge, coptic, portfolios and boxes. We will also cover a variety of image and text-making techniques. During open studio time students develop ideas and complete a book every other week, which may include edible books, recycled books, books made of natural materials visual books or books that tell stories. Field trips are planned to visit artist book collections. Each student will design and complete 'an edition' and the semester will end with a book exchange.

Section 1
Faculty: Anne Pelikan
Class No.: 23223
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Tues., 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM
Credit: 1

Oral and Visual Storytelling

Visual art is a perfect conduit for narratives, which have been the underpinnings of prints, artists’ books and zines, video games, paintings and sculptures, animation, and other mediums. In this course you will learn how to create a presentation in your chosen technique(s), incorporating words and images. Do you know someone whose life seems uniquely interesting? Are you fascinated by a place, a period of time, or an event? Your work could result in a web site, book, performance, film, installation, series of canvases, or sound environment. You will learn how to compose penetrating questions, become an active listener, conduct relevant research, digitally record interviews and translate your new knowledge into a communicative creation. We will go over type design, image transfers, and bookbinding. Relevant films, books, visiting artists, essays and field trips will enrich this course.

Section 1
Faculty: Laura Blacklow
Class No.: 23224
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Fri., 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM
Credit: 1

Socially Engaged Art

Does art have a social function? Should it? This class is for intermediate and advanced artists who want to focus their practice and use their imagination in the interest of social justice. The class is dedicated to the prolific and exciting overlap between socially engaged art and cultural practices generated by recent social movements around the world. Environmentalism, queer movements, Zapatismo, immigrant rallies, feminism, democratic movements in the Middle East, and others will be seen in dialogue with cultural producers who participate in these movements or are inspired by them. The course is project based and students will respond to social movements of their choosing while developing socially engaged art works. The class will provide technical support, assist with research, review artist projects and address recent strategies of social practices and examine the shift of socially engaged artists from “studio to situation” or “participant.” Additionally, we will consider strategies for interventions including street graphics, exhibitions (both inside and outside of the gallery) and media campaigns. We will discuss ideas and tactics, view slides, critique, and participate in one another's activism from time to time. Discussion will address the theory and practice and will draw from critical theory as a way of understanding the theoretical foundation and the historical and future development of the artist as a cultural worker.

Section 1
Faculty: Neda Moridpour
Class No.: 23326
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location:Tues., 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Media Culture Now

An understanding of how mass media functions is necessary in order to enact meaningful social change. The media representation of a drowned Syrian boy and refugees; the Black Lives Matter activists; The US military recruiting from gaming industries for Iraq and Gulf Wars; The previous US presidential elections; reality TV, etc. These images shape both our public policy and private lives. Additionally, between TV, radio, newspapers, magazines, internet, mobile phones, billboards and LED displays, we see between 250 to 3000 ads per day. These are just a few stories that indicate how text has expanded from the merely literary to all forms of cultural production, and how mass media has come to be a powerful means of expressing culture, which ‘frames’ our everyday life. Through readings, presentations, group discussions and studio work we will look critically at the media culture. We will examine texts from Shanti Kumar, Erving Goffman, Jackson Katz, John Berger, Naomi Klein, Jean Kilbourne, Guy Debord, Adbusters, The Onion, fashion magazines, and activist art. These readings will create the structure for studio work as well as challenging commercial methods by producing work about our vernacular culture. This course is designed as an introduction to digital art-making techniques and skills.

Section 1
Faculty: Neda Moridpour
Class No.: 23219
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Mon., 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Print Matters

Considering the conceptual, social, and mechanical aspects of publication, this course focuses on publication as a means of public-making through discourse: a verb rather than a noun. Publication is a social act, inherently political, anarchic and nonhierarchical in form and function, highly volatile in nature, able to break off and create new formulations of itself at will. Looking into activist, communal, commercial, and quotidian histories, as well as more current modes of art making, Print Matters utilizes the mechanism and concept of publication as a vehicle to discuss how and why we converge, and the uses of various tools, including Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign, for the formation of those convergences. Access modes of production that seem commonplace, including photocopies, stickers, postcards, and offset/newspaper printing, students will independently and collaboratively imagine and produce work for public dissemination.

Section 1
Faculty: Brian Reeves
Class No.: 23225
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Thurs., 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM
Credit: 1

Metals

Digital Fashion: Body as Site

Experimentation and material play is the starting point of this course that centers around the exploration of the relationship between the body and wearable objects. Digitally created fashion, accessories and wearable technology can all be created using a combination of techniques such as laser cutting and 3D printing, alongside more traditional handwork methods. Students will design unique adornment and objects that use the body as site. Topics covered in this course include digital fabrication techniques, possibilities for making molds using 3D printing, haute couture fashion, beauty versus repulsion, the history of adornment, and material research. There will be a strong emphasis placed on experimentation that encourages innovative thinking and problem solving. Students will be expected to communicate their design ideas through finished objects that enhance, alter, or distort the human form.

Section 1
Faculty: Jennaca Davies
Class No.: 22699
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Thurs., 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM
Credit: 1

Biomimicry in Art

Biomimicry is defined as the examination and imitation of nature to create innovative solutions to problems. Designed to push iteration and evolution, this course will require students to examine nature through the exploration of its forms, structures, processes, and elements. With a focus on analyzing pattern, texture, and repetition in natural objects, projects will be given that encourage model explorations and design studies that lead to sophisticated small-scale sculptures, jewelry, or design objects. Digital fabrication techniques such as laser cutting and 3D printing will be explored as project ideas are developed. Students will be shown how to create their own unique materials through duplication using mold making, laser cutting, or producing 3D prints that can be cast in metal at a local fabrication company. References such as cabinets of curiosity and the creation of nature collections will be discussed as we examine the study of nature and its fascination throughout history.

Section 1
Faculty: Jennaca Davies
Class No.: 22698
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Tues., 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Material Lab: Metals

Brass, bronze, copper and silver and gold are materials that have great expressive potential due to their aesthetic properties, malleability and durability. Those essential characteristics of non-ferrous metals are studied through a range of technical demonstrations, hands-on exercises and individual projects. In this introductory course we will explore historical practices in metals to understand the potential for contemporary applications in body adornment and the decorative arts.

Section 1
Faculty: Tanya Crane
Class No.: 22701
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Fri., 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Research Methodologies

This seminar course is designed to support students in the exploration and integration of research methodologies for the development of advanced studio projects and professional practice. The class is open to graduate and advanced level undergraduate students looking for rigorous academic inquiry as a parallel mode of exploration and experimentation to studio-based discoveries. Throughout the semester, students will deepen their theoretical knowledge and work comprehensively to incorporate research findings into the studio. The focus and scope of research will differ for each individual student and may take a variety of forms that are related to the ideas and concepts of the artist. Concentration in the course will be on expanding individual research methods and on learning to talk intelligibly and convincingly about your work and practice. Strategies for the development of professional practice will include portfolio building, writing and editing exercises for Artist Statement and CV, in addition to presenting a professional artist talk at the end of the semester. Readings, field trips, group critiques, discussions, presentations and other course related activities will create opportunities to engage with local professionals and collections, and will foster the integration of research and thinking into the process of making. By nature, this is a very interdisciplinary class; students working in any media are welcome.

Section 1
Faculty: Kendall Reiss
Class No.: 22697
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Weds., 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Color as Content

Color is a powerful means of expression for artists. This course, designed for beginning as well as advanced students, is an in-depth exploration of innovative options for the use of color within jewelry and metal working. Demonstrations will cover traditional surface treatments such as patinas, painting, enameling, stone setting and etching as well as the application of resins, rubber, acrylic and casting plastic. Basic metalworking techniques to accompany those methods will be instructed such as cutting, hydraulic forming and cold connecting. Class assignments encourage the development of a personal palette and its application to individual projects. Emphasis will be equally placed on technical proficiency and on individual experimentation. Upon completing this course, students will be able to create finished pieces of jewelry and objects that exhibit an understanding of materials and color and their application.

Section 1
Faculty: Tanya Crane
Class No.: 22696
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Mon., 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

MFA

Graduate Group Critique

This course is designed to build and develop the verbal and written articulation critique skills among the first and second year graduate students in a group setting facilitated by a faculty member. Critique is an essential skill for students to develop. Graduate Group Critique is a forum in which the capability of each student to identify and articulate the concerns, issues and motivations that form the basis of their research and practice expands. Through focusing on the ability to articulate the concerns investigated and addressed through each individual student’s art work, in whichever form that may take, this course assists students in both preparing for their review boards and preparing for the defense of their thesis. All first and second year Master of Fine Arts students are required to take this course each semester.

Section 1
Faculty: Danielle Abrams
Class No.: 21894
Session: Regular
Day, TIme, Location: Tues. 6PM - 9PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 0.5

Section 2
Faculty: Bonnie Donohue
Class No.: 21896
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Tues. 6PM - 9PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 0.5

Graduate Individual Critiques

This course invites second-year grad students to meet individually with faculty over the length of the semester. The one-on-one meetings will assist students in the development of their personal projects through a series of rigorous conversations scheduled according to the scope of the student's needs. Students will take this course for credit as an alternative to the grad group critique.

Section 1
Faculty: Jeannie Simms
Class No.: 22525
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Weds. 6PM - 9PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 0.5

Section 2
Faculty: Megan McMillan
Class No.: 22526
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Tues. 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 0.5

Section 3
Faculty: Bonnie Donohue
Class No.: 22626
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Weds. 1PM - 4PM, TBA, Fenway
Credi: 0.5

Graduate Internship

Internships for Studio Credit are an important part of SMFA at Tufts University’s studio arts curriculum and a great complement to your studio training. Whether your internship is with a commercial design firm, an education program, a community garden, a new media facility, a non-profit arts organization, a gallery venue, or a professional artist's studio, you will acquire valuable skills and develop new insights into your chosen creative path. Tufts Career Center staff offer extensive support and guidance along the way. Interns also participate in a two-part evaluation process, documenting rigorous self-reflection that advances professional goals and maximizes learning outcomes. This credit-bearing option is available to students in the Studio Diploma, BFA, and Dual Degree BFA + BA/BS programs. Students enrolled in the Post-Baccalaureate or MFA program are eligible with permission from the Program Directors. For detailed descriptions of internship opportunities and one-on-one advising, come visit us in the Tufts Career Center. All students seeking internships are required to receive written approval from the Internship Director at registration. Prerequisite: one year of study and no fewer than two remaining review boards prior to graduation. Transfer students must consult with Academic Affairs to determine eligibility.

Section 1
Faculty: Ryan Smith
Class No.: 24218
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Day and time not specified, Fenway
Credit: 0.5-1.5

Masters Exhibition

Details can be found here.

Section 1
Faculty: Staff
Class No.: 23159
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Day and time not specified, Fenway
Credit: 1.5

Painting

Intro to Oil Painting

This course introduces practical information about the fundamentals of oil painting: color, shape, tone, edge, composition, perspective, and substance. While the primary focus of this course will be the depiction of objects in an observational mode, we will keep in mind the fact that we all see and interpret our visual environments somewhat differently. We will examine many kinds of precedents- by artists from historical to modern to contemporary. Ultimately this course will give you the grounding necessary to take more advanced painting courses. The course will include demonstrations of materials and techniques, slide presentations, assignments, work periods, group and individual critiques. The majority of our time will be spent in a studio/work mode. Attendance is required. Because this course is grounded in representation, it is recommended that students have taken a life drawing class or its equivalent in high school or at SMFA before, or concurrent with Introduction to Oil Painting.

Section 1
Faculty: Eva Lundsager
Class No.: 23230
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Thurs., 9AM - 5PM, 12PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Intro to Figure Painting

A course for students with some experience in drawing who would like to explore the basics of painting the figure. Using a range of traditional to contemporary approaches with focus on familiarizing students with basic painting concepts such as lean to fat, color mixing from observation, building volume with value, and brushstroke.

Section 1
Faculty: Maria Brodell
Class No.: 23232
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Mon., 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Intro to Water, Color & Paper

Transparent, fluid, and direct or opaque, dry, and layered - the uses and expressions of watercolor, guache, and inks on paper and other surfaces are as varied as the individual or the era that creates them. After pop art, the spontaneous and analytical qualities of water media combined with a renewed appreciation of for paper was evident from global conceptualism, to neo-expressionism, to minimalism, and art in general, in works by Bleckner, Bueys, Bourgeois, Clemente, cucci, Kiefer, Kapoor, Martin, Mardin, Merz, Polke, Rauschenberg, Salle, Smith, Le Witt, Tuttle, and Warhol. Explore new and traditional approaches to image making, materials, and painting by thinking through watercolor, guache, and inks. Beginning with the basic skills of water, color, and paper, students develop and focus their expressive/conceptual vision and intuitive working method. Later, students are encouraged to work independently in a self-chosen direction. Basic skills include watercolor and guache techniques, image development, color, scale, rhythm, and light. We work from observation, found images, photographs, and the imagination. Visiting artists and slide lectures, suggested readings, critiques, and field trips to museums when appropriate.

Section 1
Faculty: TBA
Class No.: 23234
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Tues., Thurs., 6PM - 9PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Intro to Abstraction: Flatlands

How does one begin an abstract painting? How does one choose colors, arrangement, or scale? In Flatlands, we will complete a series of projects exploring design principles as applied to non-objective artworks. Using acrylic paint, ink and collage, students will engage with tactics and strategies for utilizing non-objective imagery towards self-directed content. Each week will bring a new design problem, with lessons culminating in a small body of work on paper or canvas, exploring a theme of the students choice. Projects will emphasize brainstorming multiple answers to visual problems over selecting the first solution that comes to mind. We will examine examples of abstraction that span continents and centuries, including 20th century pop, minimal, ab-ex, and post-modern painting, but also non-western textiles and ceramics. Midterm and Final critiques will be devoted to evaluating a student's ability to manipulate composition, shape, space, edge, color and form towards issues of their choosing. At the conclusion of the class, student should show ability to “speak graphically”, utilizing above topics to inform their decisions as they move further into painting, printmaking, or drawing. Please not we will not cover oil paint in this class. This course will focus on acquisition of basic 2d skills (color, line, shape, tone, etc.) that serve as a basis for making/designing images across multiple media. While this class is housed in the painting area, techniques and principles are applicable to advanced drawing, printmaking, and collage strategies. Media used will include charcoal, diverse collage material, pigment, and acrylic paint. While the principles introduced carry into multiple media, most of the examples that we will examine will be abstract – in the broadest sense of the word, including Western and Non-Western paintings, textiles, ceramics, drawings, etc. As such, this class serves as an excellent entry point into considering meaning and form in contemporary abstraction.

Section 1
Faculty: Santiago Cucullu
Class No.: 23237
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Fri., 9AM - 12PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 0.5

Interdisciplinary Practices: Science + Art

This course is a studio + seminar course that investigates the role of art in communicating and reflecting upon current science particularly related to intersections of environment. The course acts as a survey of methodologies for incorporating scientific material into a creative practice as well as a time for students to develop their own processes for making creative work about a topic of their interest. This course is designed to allow students with existing artistic skill to develop a practice of integrating scientific material into their work, or for students engaged in studies related to scientific fields to find new ways to think about their existing studies. The course contends with knowledge construction and encourages both the integration of current scientific information into artistic discourse while simultaneously allowing for productive critique of existing epistemological structures.

Section 1
Faculty: Isabel Beavers
Class No.: 23491
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Mon., 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 0.5

Intermediate Projects

Moving from beginning courses (where work is made in response to assignments) to developing a body of work with personal vision and expression is an important step in developing as a student and artist. This one-period course prepares students to move into the intermediate and advanced levels of instruction where personal commitment, vision, and curiosity are driving the work. Slide lectures, readings, discussions, group and individual critiques help students identify subjects they care passionately about and want to explore through paint and related media. Class time is divided between these activities with emphasis on developing a strong working community through critique. Students should be prepared to spend a good deal of time working individually outside of class. Though this course is offered in the Painting Area, it is open to students wishing to work in other media as well.

Section 1
Faculty: Julie Graham
Class No.: 23240
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Thurs., 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 0.5

Intermediate Seminar/Studio Workshop

Intermediate Studio Seminar serves as a bridge between project based basic courses and the independent work of Senior Thesis. It is concerned with developing a strong and committed studio based practice where students experience the challenges and rewards of sustaining a body of work from inception to exhibition. Each student will be provided with studio space to support their developing practice, and it is essential that applicants are self-motivated and willing to spend substantial time working out of class each week. Applicants to this course must be in their second or third year, and enrolled at least half time studio at SMFA throughout both Fall and Spring semesters. Prerequisites include: at least one 1000 PAI level course, and one 2000 PAI level course, or demonstrated equivalent through portfolio and statement. The expectation of in class and out of class work totals 15 hours a week. Send five jpegs of recent work and an artist statement to angelina.gualdoni@tufts.edu. Applications will be reviewed by the Painting Area as a whole. Approval is required to register for this class.

Section 1
Faculty: Angelina Gualdoni
Class No.: 23244
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Tues., 2PM - 5PM, 6PM - 9PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Intermediate Painting: Abstraction, Representation

This course will introduce students to the practical and historical dialog between representational and abstract modes of painting. A series of class projects lead students through a conversation between these two modes of painting, with the goal of examining their underlying assumptions, and complicating the categories of "representation" and "abstraction". It has often been said "all painting is abstract and in that the artist chooses to emphasize some things over others". Class projects distinguish between categories of “non-objective”, abstraction in the sense of emphasis or distortion, as well as the quality of abstraction inherent in conventional representation. Class concludes with several weeks of independent student work. Emphasis will be production of paintings, and talking about painting with informed intent. Students will leave this class able to understand and apply the basic techniques of representational painting (modeling to create form, atmospheric and linear perspective to create space, proportion and good composition), able to understand and apply basic techniques of abstraction (composition, materials, color, brushstroke, layering, transparency, abstraction from nature). Students should also be able to understand and discuss the historical roles abstraction and representation have played in painting history and how they apply to their own work. Some prior painting experience and an introductory Painting course is required before taking this course.

Section 1
Faculty: Angelina Gualdoni
Class No.: 23241
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Weds., 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Adv/Int Paint: Painting Space

This a studio class for advanced painting students. If you understand the evolving ways in which you work and think, it can be easier to encourage change and maturation formally and conceptually. As a result, the heart of this class deals with reflection and the ways in which you approach, consider, plan, proceed, experiment, alter, complete, present, defend and close the door on your creative endeavors. Each student will develop a cohesive series of paintings while constantly stepping back and pondering the ways in which you make and think about your objects. This is a studio painting class that is invested in a broad interpretation of what a painting can be. The content and direction of the work will be in your hands. Experimental approaches and crossover between media will be fully supported as long as you approach each and every step in the process responsibly and thoughtfully.

Section 1
Faculty: Julie Graham
Class No.: 23435
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Fri., 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Advanced Painting Seminar/Studio: Installation

This course is designed to expose advanced students focused in painting (or other media) to the potential of expanding into installation and other hybrid forms. The course will begin by examining the history of painting as installation/installation as painting. We will also explore the motivations, materials, and approaches of contemporary artists using installation and painting. Throughout the semester, students will be using the classroom studio as an experimental laboratory for developing site-specific and site responsive work. Artists of all media are invited to join the class.

Section 1
Faculty: Patricia Loper
Class No.: 23436
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Weds., 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Advanced Painting: Before, During, After

How does your contemporary sensibility relate to the work of artists working 50, 100, 200, or 500 years ago? How will you add to the richness to your artistic family tree by using new technologies, esthetics and ideas to produce new manifestations of the age old pleasures, pains and dilemmas of being a human being. Also included will be an examination of the lives, the work, and the ideologies of the artists and writers which might contain paradoxes and contradictions which might deepen our understanding of them. Attention will be paid to how we experience art both “in itself” and “in context.” Each week faculty and/or students will lead discussions of readings, images and other materials relevant to their work. Discussions will encourage a wide variety of viewpoints and interpretations aimed at deepening and expanding each class member’s view of their art in the world. There will be frequent in depth critiques of students’ work. Although much of the focus will be on painting, artists working in all media are encouraged to join the class.

Section 1
Faculty: TBA
Class No.: 23438
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Thurs., 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 0.5

Grad Paint & Drawing Practicum

This course is designed to assist graduate students with a range of studio issues related to painting drawing and the intersection and overlap between these two modes of working. It is for both committed students in painting and drawing and those who are interested in integrating these discourses and discipline into their practices, regardless of media. A discussion of drawing or painting in this class assumes the use of and interest in diverse tools and diverse outcomes from canvas and paper to digital and temporal to textual and referential. This class will assist in the advancement of skill building for artists already versed in painting and drawing and will also offer introductions to the media for those new to their use. Equal emphasis will be given to technical, formal and conceptual concerns. The class is split between individual meetings with the faculty regarding student’s independent projects and group discussions and critiques.

Section 1
Faculty: Maria Brodell
Class No.: 23442
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Tues., 6PM - 9PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 0.5

Performance

Beginning Performance Workshop

This course will introduce students to the basic principles of using the body in time and space in relation to an audience in order to convey meaning. Students will gain a contextual understanding of the history of performance art through basic readings and develop the vocabulary with which to discuss and critique performances.

Section 1
Faculty: Anthony Romero
Class No.: 22702
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Mon., 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Social Engagement: Practice and Theory

How might you build bridges and collaborate with folks in your community? In this course, we will unveil the potential that emerges when artists form partnerships with members in their communities, and create collaborative projects. This course entails two parts. In part one of the course, a collaboration will be executed, reflected upon, and discussed in class. In part two, the class will explore the discourse that surrounds social engagement and contemporary social practice projects. This will contextualize and theorize the collaborations that are being executed in class. Writers and artists to be studied include Nicholas Borriaud, Claire Bishop, Miwon Kwon, Helen Molesworth, Lucy Lippard, Grant Kester, and Aida Mancillas. We will study the work of Joseph Beuys, Jo Spence, Suzanne Lacy, Rick Lowe, Laurie Jo Reynolds, Theaster Gates, Simone Leigh, and W.A.G.E. (Working Artists in the Greater Economy). This course requires that students create collaborative partnerships with community constituents. Students will be expected to sign a waiver so that they can work outside of class. They will document and reflect upon their collaborative projects. They will participate in class discussions and critique, and attend a seminar in which theory and social practice projects are studied and discussed.

Section 1
Faculty: Anthony Romero
Class No.: 22704
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Tues., 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Advanced Performance Projects

This course is for advanced students working in any media, who are using elements of performance in their work. This aspect of performance in their practice may be related to generating content for the production of paintings, video or photography, designing the public interface with installations or interventions, as well as directly engaging in public or private actions. Students are expected to show some facet of their project as scheduled, and are expected to make use of the class in order to experiment with and develop their work. We focus equally on content, execution and public reception. Students are expected to write about both their own and the other students' work. Weekly critical readings will be assigned to all for discussion. Students must have a project in mind, in addition to a work plan.

Section 1
Faculty: Danielle Abrams
Class No.: 22705
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Thurs., 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Photography

Making a Picture

This course will appeal to students who are interested in learning about photography from a concept-based or author-centric point of view. Breaking with the notion of “straight photography," students will construct/plan their photographs, intervene in the space, construct still-lifes and larger environments, consider the veracity of photographs, and create things to be photographed. The course will emphasize the intentionality in student work and put that work in a larger historical context. The idea of “making” a picture instead of “taking" a picture has been around since the invention of photography, and was earlier referred to as “Art Photography” (to differentiate it from photography as simply an “objective," record-keeping process). Since Daguerre’s first still-lifes and Bayard’s Self-Portrait as a Drowned Man (1840), constructing the photographic image has been a point of departure for artists. Gaining particular popularity in the 1980s at the height of postmodernism, “making” practitioners today include Cindy Sherman and Gregory Crewdson, among others, as well as recent graduates Cassie Klos, Madeline Muhlberg, Marina Pinsky and Laurel Nakadate. Assignments are weekly and demanding, and the student will learn a whole new way of looking and thinking about photography.

Section 1
FacultySandra Stark
Class No.: 23556
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Thurs., 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Basic Lighting

Learning to control and manipulate light is a fundamental tool for any photographer. This hands-on course explores basic lighting techniques, including use of sunlight, flashes, continuous studio lights, strobes, and mixed lighting sources. In this course students will investigate how lighting defines an era and a look, and will also consider lighting in relation to painting, video and film. Lighting demos, group critiques, slide lectures and occasional collaborative projects will ensure that students learn effective lighting techniques. This course will cover the scientific principles of light, the history of studio lighting, and the color and color temperature of light. Students will be taught to think critically about light, and to analyze photographs in order to understand the lighting sources used in their creation. On a weekly basis, students will be asked to bring photographs of lighting that they find interesting and the instructor will explain how the lighting was achieved. Students will also be required to keep a lighting book with examples of lighting that inspires them, and a diagrammatic book of their own lighting set-ups. By the end of the course students will have a thorough understanding of the lighting equipment available through the Media Stockroom, will have experience directing their own photo shoots, and will understand how to work collaboratively in the lighting studio.

Section 1
Faculty: Sandra Stark
Class No.: 23557
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Mon., 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Photo 2

In Photo 2, students continue to use DLSR cameras, with an ongoing emphasis on operating manual settings (focus, aperture, shutter speed, ISO, color temp/ white balance), and they learn to work with medium format film cameras. They are introduced to metering and color temperature for film, and engage in further study of color and light. Students continue to use hand-held light meters, and become adept at operating small camera flashes (Speedlights), Pocket Wizards, basic lighting modifiers for small flashes (bounce, soft box), and basic continuous lighting (Tota lights). They are taught image projection, negative scanning on Epson flatbed scanner (V750), and intermediate-level digital printing (in color as well as black-and-white). They learn to work with Lightroom and further develop file management skills. Students are shown examples of key inventions in photography, as well as famous film cameras and the pictures they generated. They gain a deeper insight into and stronger grasp of practices in contemporary photography, with a continuing focus on the importance of photo editing/selection and sequencing, as well as questions around the conceptual and practical implications of images generated through digital media.

Section 1
Faculty: Claire Beckett
Class No.: 23585
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Weds., 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Project Development & Exhibition Strategy

In this class, we will examine topical issues in contemporary art practices in the context of personal project development and exhibition strategies. We will focus on mapping paths of progress through the maze of ideas, seeking imaginative solutions, and finding cohesion in the form of exhibition or book. Students will present a project in progress as it advances throughout the semester, with a goal of having a completed exhibition in model form, or a cohesive book, by the end of the semester, and will research the evolution of other artists’ works. Students in their thesis semester will focus on developing their thesis projects. Students are encouraged to examine their own practice within a broad range of interdisciplinary tactics. Assignments encourage conceptually based solutions to advance the work. Students may collaborate on their projects. Several artists will visit the class to discuss the evolution of their own work from inception to completion, and we will make field trips to examine exhibitions and their construction.

Section 1
Faculty: Bonnie Donohue
Class No.: 23587
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Tues., 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 0.5

Advanced Black & White Darkroom Photo

This is a hands-on studio class. Students learn to see what a traditional fine black and white print can be, and gain confidence with the materials. After the student becomes adept at the traditional techniques, they are encouraged to expand and break the rules in a manner that is appropriate, or inappropriate to the nature of light, film, paper, chemistry. Individual conversations will take place as students work in the dark room and the instructor oversees their techniques and monitors their progress. As the term progresses, students will each make a mural print of 40” x 50.

Section 1
Faculty: William Burke
Class No.: 23586
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Thurs., 2PM - 5PM, 9AM - 12PM
Credit: 1

Photo 1

Photo 1 is a beginning level course that introduces practice and theory of photography and strategies for conceptualizing and producing work in series. The technical basis of the course is in the digital realm: you will be introduced to digital cameras and flatbed scanners for image capture, computer programs such as Lightroom and Photoshop for image flow and processing, and archival digital printers for print output. While there is no analog darkroom production in this course, students may scan film originals as part of their work. We emphasize photography as a visual language. Assignments, lectures, readings and demonstrations create a forum to discuss photography, and its role in personal and cultural terms, in an age where nearly everyone has a digital camera or capture device of various sorts. Students are asked to consider navigating the omnipresent crush of photographic images, texts and objects we are exposed to on a daily basis through advertising in public space and printed matter, and social media in the private space of the personal computer. Basic engagement with histories of art and photography provides a platform to consider how photographs are produced, circulated, duplicated and situated in social, political, cultural and economic contexts of the moment. Students are encouraged to consider the influence of images on our daily existence: do we accept and adapt? Do we resist or intervene? How do we respond to our moment in time? How do we produce unique images, influenced by our own investigations?

Section 1
Faculty: Bonnie Donohue
Class No.: 23496
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Thurs., 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Understanding the "Art World"

Acting as both artists and investigators we will study and deconstruct the landscape of contemporary photography on a local, national and international scale. We will analyze museums, galleries, non-profit organizations, websites, social media, print media, artists, curators, writers, photo editors and other people of influence. Students will come away from the course with a firm understanding of the dynamics of contemporary photography and how they can relate to it. A portion of the course will be dedicated to critiquing student work and students’ individual research about the connections between their studio practice and other contemporary artists. Prerequisite: PHT 0011.

Section 1
Faculty: Claire Beckett
Class No.: 23588
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Fri., 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Black & White Photo in Contemporary Art

This course teaches black and white film based photography in the context the dominant, current use of digital photography in the 21st century. Students learn SLR 35mm film cameras, wet darkroom techniques and are exposed to contemporary artists working with traditional tools in inventive ways. The course supports the production of work using film and darkroom tools in self-aware ways to create artworks engaging photography and imaging history. We will consider how traditional photography fosters different responses from viewers from digital photography. Students work with film processing, darkroom enlarging and printing. Field trips and readings on photography, theory and visual culture are included. Cameras may be borrowed from the SMFA equipment stockroom.

Section 1
Faculty: Jeannie Simms
Class No.: 23589
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Tues., 6PM - 9PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 0.5

Photography Directed Study

This class consists of regular one-on-one meetings between students and faculty members over the course of the semester to critique work, assess progress, and develop mentorship. Individual critique sessions promote and foster abundant work and rapid progress by helping students deepen their understanding of their artwork, creative process, and work method through focused critical feedback at regular intervals. The student is asked to present a statement of intent, quantifying expected output, topics of interest, project development or a statement of goals at the first meeting. At the end of the semester, s/he will summarize the work; this could also be in the form of developing an artist’s statement. Student will meet regularly with faculty six or more times over the course of the semester. Meetings will range from forty five minutes to an hour. Faculty will keep a calendar of all meeting appointments. Although full sessions will not take place weekly, engagement and contact with the faculty member is required in order to assess progress and development of student work. In the weeks that full meetings are not scheduled, engagement may take place by email or in person during faculty office hours. There may also be group meetings among fellow students enrolled in this Directed Study to discuss work and progress. Group meetings will assist students in developing invaluable skills for responding and giving feedback to one another regarding the work of fellow students. Students may only take the same Directed Study course twice. Directed Study is for advanced students (MFA, Post Baccalaureate, second year Diploma, or third and fourth year BFA students). Students are limited to a maximum of two Directed Studies in one semester. Faculty signature required.

Section 1
Faculty: Sandra Stark
Class No.: 23497
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Tues., 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 0.5

Post-Baccalaureate

Post-Baccalaureate Seminar

The Seminar is a mandatory core component of the curriculum for post-baccalaureate students, who take it both fall and spring semesters. Content is determined by the needs of the class and changes from fall to spring. The seminar includes professional presentations, student presentations, directed group discussions and writing projects, critiques of work, and visits to museums, galleries, collections, and other sites. We discuss the work and ideas of class members in the context of broad issues such as the role and purpose of art making, the practice of art as a career, and the perspectives currently under discussion in art criticism and theory. Emphasis is on group collaboration and peer support for individual artistic development. To keep discussion groups small, faculty lead separate seminar sections. (These groups occasionally hold meetings together.) Be ready to talk at the first class about your ideas and needs in your artwork, school, and prospective career, so that we can plan the semester's content.

Section 1
Faculty: Nan Freeman
Class No.: 21883
Session: Regular
Days, Times, Location: Weds. 2-5 PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 0.5

Section 2
Faculty: Karmimadeebora McMillan
Class No.: 21884
Session: Regular
Days, Times, Location: Weds. 2-5 PM, TBA, Fenway
Credits: 0.5

Post-Bacc Consultations

Individual critique sessions promote and foster abundant work and rapid progress by helping you deepen an understanding of your art, creative process, and work methods through focused critical feedback at regular intervals. Students meet individually with the instructor several times during the semester for critiques, to present works in progress, and to discuss emerging issues of individual interest. These consultations support and complement the work in the Post-Baccalaureate Seminar. Post-baccalaureate students are expected to actively seek individual critiques and consultation from their assigned faculty advisors and from faculty members teaching studio courses in which they are working.

Section 1
Faculty: Nan Freeman
Class No.: 21886
Session: Regular
Day, Times, Location: Weds. 9AM - 12PM
Credit: 0.5

Section 2
Faculty: Karmimadeebora McMillan
Class No.: 21887
Session: Regular
Day, Times, Location: Weds. 6PM - 9PM
Credit:0.5

Properties of Pulp

In this class students will explore the various properties of different pulps and handmade papers through working both two and three-dimensionally. For example, over-beaten flax sheets dry hard, taut, and have enough shrinkage to bend steel; tissue-thin sheets of Japanese Kozo can be laid over an armature as a translucent skin; paper fondue can be applied over carved forms to create a lightweight, adobe-like surface. We will cover mixing, beating, coloring, sizing, and surface treatments. On-going group and individual critique and discussion are an integral part of this class as students put their work in context of the larger art world. Assignments will be given and as the semester progresses; students will design and work to complete a final project. Presentations of the instructor's research trips to Europe and Japan will be shown as well as presentations on historic and contemporary papermaking.

Section 1
Faculty: Michelle Samour
Class No.: 23206
Session: Regular
Date, Time, Location: Thurs. 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Monoprinting

A monoprint is an individual, one-of-a-kind print that can be made from a variety of traditional plates (matrices) such as metal, wood, cardboard, plexiglass, or other nontraditional surfaces that are found or manipulated. This course is designed to teach you the basics in mixing inks, handwiping and rolling techniques, and overprinting in multiple colors and plates. The making and printing of carborundum, plates, gum transfers, and chine collé also will be taught. This course provides an opportunity for students to develop an image through a related series of unique prints, perhaps putting them into a portfolio or book. Open to all levels, from beginners to those who wish to investigate new techniques.

Section 1
Faculty: Rhoda Rosenberg
Class No.: 23204
Session: Regular
Date, Time, Location: Thurs. 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Print in Color

Color can be used for descriptive, emotional and graphic purposes. Through projects, presentations, demonstrations, and study room visits, this advanced print class will explore how color can be used to further conceptual ideas. Technical considerations including color mixing, layering and registration issues will be introduced and practiced through student projects. Students will be encouraged to work across print media using processes of their own choosing. Students should have completed one of the following PRT courses: lithography, screenprinting, woodcut/relief, etching/intaglio.

Section 1
Faculty:Carolyn Muskat
Class No.: 23207
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Fri., 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Experimental Printmaking

This course is for students who are interested in approaching printmaking in an open-ended, somewhat unorthodox manner. We will focus on non-traditional techniques including waterless lithography, photocopy, gum/oil printing, ink jet prints, and direct transfers, and explore ways of integrating experimental drawing and appropriated images. The aim of this class is not simply to make prints, drawings, and/or digital images, but to find ways of working that may be a combination or hybrid of all three and open up routes for finding new imagery. Group critiques and individual consultation will be ongoing. This class is open to students at all levels, but some previous printmaking experience is expected. Students will have free access to the print studio in the afternoon in order to continue working on individual projects.

Section 1
Faculty: John Schulz
Class No.: 23212
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Mon., 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Intensive Print & Paper Workshop

In this class, we will focus on integrating handmade paper with the printed image. We will look at a number of contemporary artists who are using repetition of material and imagery in their work including Kwang-Young Chun, Do-Ho Suh, Polly Apfelbaum, Ai Weiwei, Chuck Close, Mark Bradford, Allan McCullum, El Anatsui, Tara Donovan, Doris Salcedo and Ryan McGinniss, among others. We will ask ourselves how the use of various fibers and handmade paper processes support the printed image, and respond to the notion of re-configuration and repetition.

Section 1
Faculty: Michelle Samour, William Peters Scott
Class No.: 23424
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Weds., 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Screenprinting A-Z

Students will acquaint themselves with a wide range of screenprinting approaches using hand-drawn, photographic, and digital stencil techniques. We will emphasize the use of the computer as a means to filter and manipulate images in order to create color separations for screenprinting. Through the discussion of the history of print media, production and popular culture, we will conceptually explore a variety of approaches and formats for translating our ideas through screenprinting--- while thinking about the role of "multiples". Experimentation and an interdisciplinary approach to art making are encouraged.

Section 1
Faculty:Jennifer Schmidt
Class No.: 23202
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Tues., 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Section 2
Faculty: Catherine Ellis Duke, Penghuan Guo
Class No.: 23203
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Fri., 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Intermediate/Advanced Screenprinting

Intermediate and advanced students will have the opportunity to explore the screenprinting process in depth through a critical inquiry into the history of printed media. Student participation in group discussion and field trips to see contemporary examples of printmaking will be emphasized. We work to push the boundaries of screenprinting through experimentation with materials and presentation, and explore the use of the computer to create color separations in combination with photographic stencil techniques. Knowledge of the screenprinting process and/or prior enrollment in a screenprinting course is required. Prerequisite: Screenprinting A-Z, or Screenprinting: The Whole Story.

Section 1
Faculty: Jennifer Schmidt
Class No.: 23211
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Weds., 9AM - 12PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 0.5

Etching and Intaglio

Intaglio printing means printing ink from the incised marks in a plate or matrix. Etching means that acid is used to corrode these marks into the plate. This is a course for beginning students seeking thorough exposure to intaglio printmaking, both etched and not, and for intermediate/advanced students who wish to explore the medium in greater depth. In addition to etching basics (hard ground, soft ground, and aquatint), we will give special attention to a broad array of intaglio applications: found objects, collagraph approaches, alternative plates (non-etched), collage, and monoprint techniques.

Section 1
Faculty: William Peters Scott
Class No.: 23215
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Fri., 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Woodcut/Relief Printmaking

This class is for students who are interested in exploring the expressive potential of the woodcut/relief print. The simplicity of woodcut facilitates direct, intuitive involvement, and allows for great flexibility in scale and individual approach; this may range from developing stark, powerful images in black-and-white to building rich, textural, and painterly images in color. The emphasis of this class will be on the development of individual vision and approach to the medium. We will cover basic technical information on various woods for printmaking, linoleum and plastic blocks, inks, tools and tool maintenance, paper, printing both with and without a press, color, and options for multi-block and reduction prints. Additional techniques will be introduced according to the ongoing needs and direction of the class.

Section 1
Faculty: John Schulz
Class No.: 23213
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Tues., 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Independent Study: Papermaking

Section 1
Faculty: Michelle Samour
Class No.: 24261
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Day and time not specified, Fenway
Credit: 0.5

Professional Development

Creative Futures: Business Essentials

This course is a practical introduction to 'being' an artist. Rather than only considering the conventional studio-to-gallery approach, the course begins at your studio and critically asks why you make, followed by notions of audience, intentions, and process to find new, alternate and the most fitting means to sustain your work and a professional artist life. A coordinated sequence of class lectures, guest speakers, readings, writing, public speaking and other assignments are presented such that students can exercise accumulated skills and apply them to life in and out of the studio.

Section 1
Faculty: Aithan Shapira
Class No.: 23426
Session: Regular
Day, Times, Location: Fri. 9AM-12PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 0.5

Internship for Credit

Internships for Studio Credit are an important part of SMFA at Tufts University’s studio arts curriculum and a great complement to your studio training. Whether your internship is with a commercial design firm, an education program, a community garden, a new media facility, a non-profit arts organization, a gallery venue, or a professional artist's studio, you will acquire valuable skills and develop new insights into your chosen creative path. Tufts Career Center staff offer extensive support and guidance along the way. Interns also participate in a two-part evaluation process, documenting rigorous self-reflection that advances professional goals and maximizes learning outcomes. This credit-bearing option is available to students in the Studio Diploma, BFA, and Dual Degree BFA + BA/BS programs. Students enrolled in the Post-Baccalaureate or MFA program are eligible with permission from the Program Directors. For detailed descriptions of internship opportunities and one-on-one advising, come visit us in the Tufts Career Center. All students seeking internships are required to receive written approval from the Internship Director at registration. Prerequisite: one year of study and no fewer than two remaining review boards prior to graduation. Transfer students must consult with Academic Affairs to determine eligibility.

Section 1
Faculty: Ryan Smith
Class No.: 23428
Session: Regular
Day, Times, Location: Time and day not specified, Fenway
Credit: 0.5-1.5

Professional Practices: Survival Skill

In this course, advanced students from all disciplines and practices will assemble the tools necessary for sustaining their own productive, art centered professional life after art school. Weekly visiting experts make this course unique. Along with the privilege of hosting these guests in a small class, students will have private one-on-one elevator talks with each one, an experience one student called “beyond valuable!” Guests typically include a variety of artists representing diverse practices, independent and institutional curators, writers, activists, gallerists, a director of an artist residency, a copyright attorney, a tax accountant, and a financial values advisor. Students report that the “art world” can appear bafflingly intimidating and that the prospect of leaving the nurturing environment of art school is “honestly terrifying”. Functioning as a supportive artist cooperative, this class aims to give students the courage and confidence to embrace the challenge of finding support and inspiration for their practice. Informed by exploring a variety of career trajectories and options presented by guests, students will create a malleable personal mission statement and develop short term and long term goals and strategies. They will practice their most effective ways of presenting their work and ideas, and together practice public speaking and editing best images. Collaborative writing exercises will include artist statements, bios, press releases, and project proposals as well as websites, and social media tools. Each student will produce a published pamphlet of a body of their work. Open to graduate students and advanced undergraduates by permission.

Section 1
Faculty: Susan Belton
Class No.: 23427
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Thurs. 9AM-12PM, Thurs. 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Sculpture

Kinetic Sculpture

This course offers students an opportunity to explore the delights and complexities of movement as an added dimension in their art. Working individually and as teams, students will be expected to analyze, design, build and control a variety of working devices to integrate kinetics into their sculpture. This is a studio/seminar course which will include slide lectures, films, field trips, weekly readings, both class and individual critiques and guest artists.

Section 1
Faculty: Ken Hruby
Class No.: 21927
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Tues., 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

3D Foundations

This course will orient students to the shops, tools and materials in areas of the school necessary for designing, modeling and fabricating a full range of structures and objects. Students are introduced to a range of important technical processes located in the various shops and sculpture facilities and are introduced to a variety of basic construction techniques including welding, woodworking and plaster mold-making and casting.

Section 1
Faculty: Floor Van De Velde, Graham Yeager
Class No.: 21882
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Mon., 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Digital Design and Fabrication

This course introduces essential skills for artists working today in all facets of the visual arts: sculptors can create objects and manipulate form and scale, place digital works in existing public space, explore natural light and shadow over annual cycles, generate rapid prototypes for further analysis or production, and to generate animated walk-thrus for proposal presentations; painters and printmakers can explore perspective imagery; video, film and animation artist can create scenes, objects, and explore both indoor and natural lighting alternative and generate animations. Possible output options include laser cutting a variety of materials from paper to plastics, rapid prototyping through 3D printing and the generation of 2D patterns from unfolded 3D digital objects.

Section 1
Faculty: Floor Van De Velde
Class No.: 21892
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Weds., 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 0.5

Sonic Forms

Sonic Forms addresses acoustic and sonic possibilities of three-dimensional space while also considering sound as an independent sculptural medium. Approaching sound from a variety of disciplinary angles — visual art, architecture, performance, digital imaging, and music — the course will address the use of sound in a variety of media whilst encouraging students to create new modes of experiencing and engaging with the aural realm through three dimensional objects and/or space. Sound sculpture and installation shares a history with contemporary visual arts, linking Futurism, Dada, Fluxus, Bauhaus, Post-Modern, and relational art. Students will acquire knowledge of the conceptual and historical background through short lectures and readings of related research topics such as sound art, installation art, experimental music, phonography, audio-visual art, and acoustics. Possible projects and experiments may include sound sculptures, kinetic sculptures, experimental radio works, site-specific sound installation, sound walks, instrument making, graphic scores, sound poetry, video art, and acoustic ecology.

Section 1
Faculty: Floor Van De Velde
Class No.: 21895
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Thurs., 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Advanced Sculpture Projects

Advanced Sculpture Projects is a studio and seminar course designed for self-directed students working on an advanced level. Seminars will include topic-based lectures, weekly readings, viewings, field trips and critiques. Students will present two self-directed finished works for critique and three research-based presentations.

Section 1
Faculty: Mark Cooper
Class No.: 21885
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Tues., 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Material Lab: Fiber

In this course you will learn a different fiber-related technique each week, including: knitting, crocheting, dying, weaving, flexible structures, felting and sewing by hand and machine. We will also explore the history of these processes and their uses in contemporary art and you will gain a basic understanding of each technique by focusing on their sculptural capabilities.

Section 1
Faculty: Samantha Fields
Class No.: 21893
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Thurs., 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Advanced Seminar: Shelter & Land

This advanced seminar takes an in depth look at topics related to “shelter” and “landscape” and explores crossovers with architecture, sculpture, function and design, as well as relationships between culture, nature and the crisis of sustainability. From the failures of the public housing projects to the contemporary innovations of the engineered natural world, artists have explored these ideas from the Land Art of the 1960s and 1970s to the sustainable design emphasis of today.

Section 1
Faculty: Barbara Gallucci
Class No.: 21889
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Tues., 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 0.5

Ephemeral Objects

Ephemeral Objects is an intermediate-level studio course that examines the impermanent, the durational and the temporary aspects of sculpture. In this course we'll explore sculpture that resists its history as a permanent monument and embraces its fleeting nature, like Janine Antoni's chocolate busts or Martin Klimas' shattering figurines or Berndnaut Smilde's indoor clouds. This studio course will employ a wide range of material and media and will consist of a series of projects, critiques, readings, discussions, field trips and introduction to the work of contemporary artists in the field.

Section 1
Faculty: Megan Mcmillan
Class No.: 21890
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Weds., 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Sculpture Directed Study

This class consists of one on one meetings in which a student will meet individually with a faculty member several times over the course of the semester to critique work, assess progress, and develop mentorship between individual faculty and students. Individual critique sessions promote and foster abundant work and rapid progress by helping students deepen their understanding of their artwork, creative process, and work method through focused critical feedback at regular intervals. The student is asked to present a statement of intent, quantifying expected output, topics of interest or a statement of goals at the first meeting. At the end of the semester s/he will summarize the work; this could also be in the form of developing an artist’s statement. Faculty will meet each student four or more times a semester for a full hour. There may also be group meetings with peers to discuss work and progress among fellow students. Group meetings will assist students in developing invaluable skills for responding and giving feedback to one another regarding the work of fellow students. Students can only take the same Directed Study course twice. Directed Study is for upper classmen and advanced students (MFA, Post-Baccalaureate, Diploma or Third and Fourth year BFA Students). Students are limited to a maximum of two Directed Studies in one semester which cannot be in the same area. Faculty permission required.

Section 1
Faculty: Barbara Gallucci
Class No.: 21888
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Tues., 9AM - 12PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 0.5

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis Program

Senior Thesis provides a platform for the development of an ongoing independent art practice. The program spans two continuous semesters, constructing a year-long trajectory of research, writing, art-making and career-building centered around critiques with program faculty, visiting artists, and arts professionals. Students are challenged to explore their own individual interests and practices, within the context of a group of peers and faculty, towards the goal of developing a coherent project. Independent studio work is required throughout the year, and students should expect to spend at least 6-12 additional hours per week both working in the studio and attending lectures, field trips, etc. outside of class time. During the Fall semester, students will concentrate on formal research and writing exercises in addition to the development of an independent body of work. As a class, we will regularly engage in discourse and the public exchange of ideas in the form of individual critiques and discussions; small group interactions with peers in reading circles, roundtables, and working groups; whole program group meetings, lectures, and artist talks; and interactions with thinkers and specialists from our wider university and global communities. Students are challenged to explore different modes and methodologies of research and art-making as well as make connections between art and other intellectual and creative practices. The emphasis in the Spring semester shifts to production and the development of various professional practices, including writing about and formally presenting your work. The Spring semester culminates in the Senior Thesis Exhibition, towards which students are required to work in planning, development, marketing, catalogue development, as well as building and installation of the exhibition.

Section 1
Faculty: Andy Graydon, Isabel Beavers, Kendall Reiss
Class No.: 23172
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Thurs. 9 AM - 12 PM, 2 PM - 5 PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Sound

Mixing Sound

Have you ever recorded dialogue for a film or video project only to discover that it sounds too muddy or noisy? Do the soundtracks or sound effects you make lack punch? Are audio concepts such as gain staging, headroom, or sidechaining confusing you? If so, then this course is for you! Mixing Sound covers the art of audio postproduction for moving picture as well as for stand-along expression. Producing audio mixes that are pleasing to listeners is an art form. The manipulation of a source signal’s level, dynamics, as well as spatial position, and the addition of effects such as reverb and delay, can have a huge impact on the overall feel of a mix. This course de-mystifies these processes, and is intended for students who seek to achieve clean, crisp and captivating voice-overs, music beds, and sound effects for their moving image projects or audio projects. Prior experience with non-linear timeline editing (e.g., Final Cut X, Adobe Premier, Pro Tools, Logic Pro or similar) is recommended.

Section 1
Faculty: Nate Harrison
Class No.: 23469
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Weds., 9AM - 12PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 0.5

Appropriation Art: Duchamp-Digital Disobedience

Appropriation Art is both a seminar and production class that will provide students with a thorough understanding of the issues and techniques surrounding the artistic act of using pre-existing materials as one's own. While each student's output will be primarily electronic in form, the class will explore the ways in which appropriation strategies have been implemented and interpreted across media within modern and contemporary art. From Duchamp's readymades to Pop Art to the Pictures Movement to today's various music and remix cultures, the institutional, political, legal and economic structures that have conditioned a discourse of appropriation art will be rigorously interrogated. Class readings will come from art and cultural criticism, artists' texts, and actual court case decisions. Student projects will be assessed through the histories and theories acquired during class discussion. REQUIREMENTS: A knowledge of modern art history is helpful. Some experience with digital audio editing tools is required. Experience with video production will be beneficial. Engagement with the weekly readings and participation in group discussion is expected.

Section 1
Faculty: Nate Harrison
Class No.: 23466
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Tues., 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 0.5

Special Topics: The Audio-Visual Imagination

Section 1
Faculty: Alessandra Campana, Andy Graydon
Class No.: 24057
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Tues., 12PM - 3PM, Granoff Music Center Rm 075, Fenway
Credit: 0.5

Video

Video I

Video I consists of a series of intensive workshops designed to give you the skills to become a technically proficient and thinking video maker. Students produce individual projects through hands-on instruction in camera composition, lighting, sound, and editing. We survey and analyze current trends in video and digital art practices through frequent screenings, readings, and discussions, and we explore a wide range of possibilities for video art production including single-channel, installation, performance, and Internet projects. We provide access to equipment such as mini DV cameras, microphones, lighting kits, and Final Cut Pro nonlinear editing systems, computers for multi-channel installation, video projectors and screens for image display, audio speakers for multi-channel and surround sound installation.

Section 1
Faculty: Nicolas Brynolfson
Class No.: 23473
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Mon., 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Video II

This course is for experienced video students to learn and improve upon skills useful for creating advanced video projects. The emphasis for the course will be the intersection of video art, motion graphic design, and music. Using HD cameras, including DSLR/hybrids, and software such as Adobe Photoshop, After Effects, and other video and audio tools, students are encouraged to think of video as a plastic medium with a direct relationship to music, as well as other fine art mediums and graphic arts. Seminars will explore topics relevant to recent video art discourse including: the power of the image; the dialectic between commercial music video, vernacular video YouTube), and fine art.

Section 1
Faculty: Laine Rettmer
Class No.: 23474
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Fri., 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Advanced Production Migration

This advanced seminar/studio course will combine critical screening, readings, practice and critique. Through screenings and readings, we will examine the notion of displacement in the work of art - both as a personal and global experience. We will look at art works that deal with migration, borders, refugeeism, memory, the notion of home and multiculturalism. Students will receive assignments and produce 3 works throughout the semester in various forms of time based media such as single and multi- channel video, performance, video and sound installation as well as interdisciplinary time-based work. The course will offer few advanced workshops in production, staging and editing.

Section 1
Faculty: Irina Yakubov
Class No.: 23548
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Thurs., 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Video I for Grads

Video I consists of a series of intensive workshops designed to give you the skills to become a technically proficient and thinking video maker. Students produce individual projects through hands-on instruction in camera composition, lighting, sound, and editing. We survey and analyze current trends in video and digital art practices through frequent screenings, readings, and discussions, and we explore a wide range of possibilities for video art production including single-channel, installation, performance, and Internet projects. We provide access to equipment such as mini DV cameras, microphones, lighting kits, and Final Cut Pro nonlinear editing systems, computers for multi-channel installation, video projectors and screens for image display, audio speakers for multi-channel and surround sound installation.

Section 1
Faculty: Mary Ellen Strom
Class No.: 23547
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Weds., 9AM - 12PM, 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Visual and Critical Studies

History of Film II: 1955-Present

The two Histories of Film courses are sequential, one-semester courses that may be taken separately, but are created as a year-long inquiry into the history of the art of cinema. Constructed as a foundations course, we will examine the historical development of cinema from its inception in the late nineteenth century through the present. Presented through a broad historical, aesthetic, and critical framework, this course will introduce the student to the study of cinematic representation by focusing on the first half-century of its development in the fall and the second half-century of its development in the spring. By investigating the aesthetic, formal, and stylistic devices of film as well as its narrative codes and structures we will consider the evolution of its rich and complex language. Our study will focus on such noteworthy film movements as the early international avant-garde, German Expressionism, Soviet filmmaking of the 1920s, the classical studio Hollywood film (including genre and authorship studies), postwar cinemas in Japan and Italy, international New Wave cinemas of the 1960s, post-classical American cinema, World cinema, contemporary independent film practices, and more.

Section 1
Faculty: Tina Wasserman
Class No.: 23489
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Thurs., 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Intro to Contemporary Sculpture

This class discusses the work of one sculptor per week. Our case studies are: Claes Oldenburg, Sol Lewitt, Eva Hesse, Niki De Saint Phalle, Joseph Beuys, Tony Cragg, Jessica Stockholder, Doris Salcedo, Yinka Shonibare, Do-Ho-Suh. We will look at the different phases of the artists’ body of work, which will be contextualized historically and theoretically. Students will analyze different types of sources (artist statements, exhibition reviews, curatorial texts and scholarly essays), in order to view the same topic from different perspectives. The goal of the course is to allow an understanding of contemporary sculpture through the study of a selection of personalities. The approach will offer the opportunity to expose students to in depth analysis of primary and secondary sources, and refer to these sources as evidence in writing projects.

Section 1
Faculty: Silvia Bottinelli
Class No.: 23549
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Mon., 9AM - 12PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

History & Aesthetics in Hitchcock

This course will provide the student with an overview of the cinematic work of Alfred Hitchcock. Using critical, psychoanalytic and feminist film theory we will investigate the various historic, aesthetic, thematic and formal concerns threaded throughout his film work. In our study we will examine his skillful narrative coding of the suspense thriller using point-of-view/spectator identification techniques, his powerful but often disturbing representation of women, the patterns of looking and voyeurism inscribed in his work and much more.

Section 1
Faculty: Tina Wasserman
Class No.: 23493
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Fri., 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Neo-Noir and Its Contexts

This course will introduce the student to a group of historic American films produced between 1941 and 1958 that are often identified as "film noir." We compare this historic group of films with later incarnations of film noir, examining how this original historic body of work profoundly influenced a wide range of neo-noir practices. We will contextualize these films through broad historical, aesthetic and critical frameworks and analyze a range of common underlying themes and preoccupations including: the creation of a dark and brooding pessimism; the representation of the noir woman as a "femme fatale;" modernity, postmodernity, urbanism, postwar paranoia and anxiety, the existential impulse of noir, issues of race, gender and more. The work of such directors as Billy Wilder, Jules Dassin, Roman Polanski, Ridley Scott, David Lynch, Bill Duke, Rian Johnson, Christopher Nolan, Chan-wook Park, the Coen Brothers, and more will be considered.

Section 1
Faculty: Tina Wasserman
Class No.: 23494
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Thurs., 6PM - 9PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

History of Photography Through Ideas II

John Tagg writes that it is impossible to teach the history of photography as a "discrete and coherent field or discipline" when the medium has been employed across such a disparate set of fields as forensic science and abstract expressionism, to name just two. With that in mind, it is perhaps more useful to approach photographic histories through ideas and topics, such as the family unit, worth, propaganda, supervision, record keeping, obsession and so forth. Over the course of the term we will address different artistic, cultural, political and social premises and investigate any intersections with photography over the past two hundred years. Presentations will draw on written and visual material from the late 18th century forward through today. There will be weekly background readings, class discussion and four assigned papers between 500 and 2500 words in length.

Section 1
Faculty: James Dow
Class No.: 23778
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Thurs., 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1
 

Contemporary Art: The Present

A single-semester class that presents an overview of contemporary art on exhibit primarily but not exclusively in New York City galleries, specifically in Chelsea and the Lower East Side. While the class is linked with Contemporary Art: The Prequel it is not a requirement for admission. That said, Contemporary Art: The Present is not an introductory level course and should not be the first Visual & Critical Studies class taken at the SMFA. A significant degree of experience in looking at and talking about art is necessary, since the emphasis will be on a discrete viewing and commentary on exhibitions with additional background provided when required.

Section 1
Faculty: James Dow
Class No.: 23495
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Mon., 2PM - 5PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1
 

Food as Sculpture

(Cross-listed w/ENV 128) An unprecedented attention has been paid to Food as a form of art in the past few years. This seminar explores recent curatorial, theoretical and historical contributions on this topic. We will look at food as a subject for Pop sculpture; the incorporation of food in New Realists ready mades; food as edible material for three dimensional work; ingestion, food and the body in sculptural and performative pieces; feminist installation art and references to the kitchen; artist restaurants, food and counterculture; food decay in sculptural works, as a signifier of time or trigger of disgust; gardening and farming as social sculpture; and relational projects using cooking and dining as tools for community building. The readings assigned will address theoretical aspects, such as the aesthetic and phenomenological experience of taste; memory and everyday foods; identity politics; and relational aesthetics. The list of artists discussed includes: Claes Oldenburg; Carolee Schneemann; Hannah Wilke; Janine Antoni; Robin Weltsch and Vicki Hodgetts; Gordon Matta Clark; Allen Ruppersberg; Paul McCarthy; Joseph Beuys; Rirkrit Tiravanija; Andi Sutton; and Michael Rakovitz.

Section 1
Faculty: Silvia Bottinelli
Class No.: 23551
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Thurs., 9AM - 12PM, TBA, Fenway
​​​​​​​Credit: 1
 

Arte Povera

In 1967, critic Germano Celant coined the phrase "Arte Povera". Such label defined the unsystematic work of a group of contemporary Italian artists that were interested in simple materials and their physical and chemical transformations. The word “povera”, literally “poor”, also meant to criticize Pop Art, interpreted as an acceptance of consumerism. Mainly through sculpture, installation, and performance, Arte Povera offered an alternative to the traditional mediums of Classical and Renaissance art. The class will analyze Arte Povera's history, reception, and context by considering theoretical, cultural, social, political, and gender issues in 1960s and 1970s Italy. The diverse perspectives of select Italian and English speaking scholars will be taken into account.

Section 1
Faculty: Silvia Bottinelli
Class No.: 23552
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Weds., 9AM - 12PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Mass Incarceration & Lit Confi

(Cross-listed w/TCS 145) Seminar on the literature of incarceration, including literary and sociological texts directly and indirectly pertaining to the experience of confinement. Study of the US Criminal Justice System includes special attention to the structuring ideologies of race, class, gender-sexuality, and educational opportunity. Authors will include: Herman Melville, Franz Kafka, Paul Lawrence Dunbar, Suzan-Lori Parks, August Wilson, Henrik Ibsen, Maya Angelou, Peter Mehlman, Toni Morrison, Julia Sudbury, Michelle Alexander, James Forman. Meets most weeks at the men’s medium security state prison in Shirley, MA; transportation from the Medford Campus provided. Designed in conjunction with the Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program and composed of Tufts students and incarcerated students in equal numbers.

Section 1
Faculty: Hilary Binda
Class No.: 23996
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Tues., 1:20PM - 4:20PM, Elliot Pearson, Room 153, Medford/Somerville
Credit: 1
 

Landscapes and Ecologies

Focusing on how artists have engaged with their environment from the eighteenth century through the twentieth, this class will subject the subject matter of landscape to close scrutiny. Through a series of case studies, we will examine how the rise in popularity of landscape art allowed artists to speak more broadly about social issues through the depiction of their surroundings, and we will consider how the evolution of the modern world impacted how artists regard the land and emerging urban contexts. Integrating contemporary and historical approaches, this class looks at parallel developments across Western art, and will consider how various stylistic movements in 18th, 19th and 20th century painting, as well as photography, graphic arts, sculpture, performance and environmental art have reacted to the significance of space and place, and humankind’s impact on the land.

Section 1
Faculty: Emily Gephart
Class No.: 23550
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Fri., 9AM - 12PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1

Art of Building Empire

How Inka and Mexica cultures used art and architecture as visual diplomacy to disseminate the ideas of their ambitiously expanding governments. What were some of the contributing socio-political factors that led these hegemonic powers to achieve domination of vast territories in such short periods of time (roughly one hundred years)? What role did visual culture play in helping them maintain their social control? Sources of social power for Amerindian sovereigns and the strategies they devised to co-opt dominion, negotiate power conflicts, as well as underwrite and disseminate their ideological interests over multi-ethnic constituents. Primary but not exclusive focus on Mexica and Inka statecraft and visual diplomacy to expose students to the variety of smart-power tactics used by regimes to expand their hegemony.

Section 1
Faculty: Eulogio Guzman
Class No.: 23490
Session: Regular
Day, Time, Location: Tues., 9AM - 12PM, TBA, Fenway
Credit: 1